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Articles in category "Shipbuilding"

Russia’s Nevsky Shipyard signs salvage ship deal

The Russian Nevsky shipyard is to build four multipurpose small-draught salvage vessels of length 79.85m and width of 17.36m, writes Jaroslaw Adamowski.

Nevsky Shipyard obtained the contract to build the vessels for the Russian state authorities, from the government-run Direction of State Contractor of Marine Transport Development Programmes, the shipbuilder said in a press release.

The deal was awarded through an "open competitive tender," Nevsky said.

Deliveries of the salvage craft, known as ‘project MPSV12’, are scheduled for late December 2018, and the vessels will be in service at Russia’s Astrakhan, Arhangelsk, Novorossiysk and Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky ports. Local news site Portnews.ru reported the contract value to be about RUB 7.9billion (US$184.5million).

Each will be powered by two main engines, each rated 2,600kW, which the yard estimates will enable a speed capability of 14 knots.

Based in Shlisselburg, in Russia’s north-western part, Nevsky Shipyard was set up in 1952. The company says it specialises in building ready-to-operate vessels of various types, which include salvage vessels, tankers, dry-cargo vessels, tug-boats, run-about boats, auxiliary and supply vessels.

Source: http://www.motorship.com/news101/industry-news/russias-nevsky-shipyard-signs-salvage-ship-deal

The Maersk Triple E class container ship behemoth

The Maersk Triple E class is a family of large, fuel-efficient container ships, designed as a successor to the Mærsk E-class. In February and June 2011, Maersk awarded Daewoo Shipbuilding two US$1.9 billion contracts ($3.8bn total) to build twenty of the ships.

The name "Triple E" is derived from the class's three design principles: "Economy of scale, Energy efficient and Environmentally improved". These ships are expected to be not only the world's largest ships in service, but also the most efficient containerships per twenty-foot equivalent unit (TEU) of cargo.

The ships will be 400 metres (1,312 ft) long and 59 metres (194 ft) wide. While only 3 metres (9.8 ft) longer and 4 metres (13 ft) wider than E-class ships, the Triple E ships will be able to carry 2,500 more containers. With a draft of 14.5 metres (48 ft), they will be too deep to use any port in the Americas or cross the Panama Canal, but will be able to transit the Suez Canal when sailing between Europe and Asia.


One of the class's main design features are the dual 32 megawatts (43,000 hp) ultra-long stroke two-stroke diesel engines, driving two propellers at a design speed of 19 knots (35 km/h; 22 mph). Slower than its predecessors, this class uses a strategy known as slow steaming, which is expected to lower fuel consumption by 37% and carbon dioxide emissions per container by 50%. The Triple E design helped Maersk win a "Sustainable Ship Operator of the Year" award in July 2011.

Maersk plans to use the ships to service routes between Europe and Asia, projecting that Chinese exports will continue to grow. The Europe-Asia trade represents the company's largest market; it already has 100 ships serving this route. Maersk hopes to consolidate its share of the Europe-Asia trade with the addition of the Triple-E class ships.

sources: Businessweek, Wikipedia

Why Is The Global Shipbuilding Business Struggling?

There's news this week that shipbuilder STX Finland will close what it describes as "the world's leading ferry builder," a yard where the company also built small cruise ships, icebreakers and naval craft.

The company blamed economic conditions for the closure of the Rauma Shipyard. Work from there will be shifted to the company's facility in Turku. About 700 people will lose their jobs.
"The anticipated volume of future demand is not enough to sustain two shipyards at STX Finland," the company said in a statement. "The Turku Shipyard is able to build all types of vessels. The restructuring will not limit the company's offering or reduce the volume of its operations."

A Global Problem
The troubles at STX Finland mirror much of what's happening in the global shipbuilding industry.

The company is a subsidiary of South Korea's STX PanOcean, which itself filed for bankruptcy in June. At the time, the company said a "combination of a sharp decline in freight rates, a delayed industry recovery, oversupply of ships due to an increased production at Chinese shipyards and higher fuel costs drove up debt and squeezed margins."

The problems aren't confined to South Korea, the world's second-largest shipbuilder.

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