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UK Offshore Wind Construction Had “Bumper Year In 2016,”

Construction in the UK’s offshore wind sector reached an impressive high in 2016, with total construction value set at £4.1 billion, increasing from £2.45 billion in 2015, and accounting for 21% of all UK construction contract value in the year.

New analysis from Barbour ABI, a leading provider of construction intelligence services, highlighted the “bumper year” the UK offshore wind sector experienced, from the point of view of the construction sector. Offshore wind farms accounted for 42% of all UK construction contract value in the utilities and power sector, and 21% of the country’s entire infrastructure sector.

Further, Barbour ABI predicts that this trend is only set to continue through 2017, with a healthy pipeline of future offshore wind projects set to make 2017 another strong year, and up to £23.2 billion worth of construction contract value already in planning.

“Back in 2013 offshore windfarms accounted for only 7.5% of the annual construction value for the utilities and power sector, which increased to 42% in 2016, on the back of significant investment in this type of project,” explained Michael Dall, lead economist at Barbour ABI. “With reports showing that the cost of producing electricity in this way have fallen significantly, the increase in construction value makes sense.”

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Two ships collide near Johor, spilling about 300 tonnes of oil

Two container vessels, one of them Singapore-registered, collided off Pasir Gudang on Tuesday.

The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) said it was notified by the Johor Port Authority (JPA) of a collision between a Singapore-registered container vessel WAN HAI 301 and a Gibraltar-registered container vessel APL DENVER off Pasir Gudang Port at 11.50pm on Tuesday.

One of the bunker tanks on the APL DENVER was reportedly damaged and spilled approximately 300 tonnes of oil, MPA said in a press release on Wednesday.

JPA has deployed four anti-pollution craft and an oil boom to contain the oil spill.

Some oil patches were spotted in Singapore, with the spillage contained off the western of Pulau Ubin.

MPA said it has activated eight anti-pollution craft with dispersant spraying capabilities to clean up the oil.

There have been no reports of injury and traffic in the East Johor Straits and Singapore's port operations remain unaffected, MPA said.

source: The Star Online

Maersk Line Looking to Buy German Container Shipping Operator Hamburg Süd

The shipping arm of Danish conglomerate A.P. Moeller-Maersk A/S is looking to buy German peer Hamburg Süd, people with knowledge of the matter said, a deal that would help Maersk Line boost its presence in global trade with Latin America.

Maersk Line, the world’s leading container-shipping operator, is interested in acquiring the entire Hamburg Süd business, which had $6.7 billion in revenue in 2015, not just picking up a few vessels, a person familiar with the matter said.

While it has bought or chartered ships from distressed peers like Korea’s Hanjin Shipping Co., which declared bankruptcy in August, Maersk’s last full-scale acquisition was in 2005 when it bought P&O Nedlloyd.

Hamburg Süd, the world’s seventh-biggest container operator in terms of capacity, is part of the Oetker Group, a family-owned German conglomerate involved in shipping, banking, food and beverages.

The Wall Street Journal last week reported that the Oetker family was discussing a sale of the shipping business as early as this year. A person involved in the matter said the family will likely make a decision on whether to sell this week.

Maersk, which moves about 15% of global seaborne freight, has publicly said it is looking for acquisitions to increase its market share during one of the most challenging times for the industry, with freight rates well below sustainable levels over the past two years.

Container ships that transport 95% of the world’s manufactured products are caught in one of the deepest ever down-cycles, marked by anemic global trade and a glut of tonnage in the water.

continue reading at The Wall Street Journal